The case of Stacy and Nathalie – when DNA doesn’t work; and The organisation of forensic science in Europe and the ENFSI

Invited Speaker: Dr Jan De Kinder (Vic Police)

Dr Jan De Kinder obtained a PhD in science at the university of Antwerp (Belgium) in the field of laser spectroscopy. In 1996, he was tasked to develop the area of crime scene ballistics and firearms identification at a new Belgian Forensic Laboratory. In 2001, he became the head of the Ballistics Section.

Between 2006 and 2018 Jan was the director of the National Institute of Forensic Science and Criminology, a Belgian Federal Scientific Institute. He chaired the European Network of Forensic Science Institutes (ENFSI) 2009-2011 and again 2015-2017. He also chaired the International Forensic Strategic Alliance (IFSA) 2007-2008 and again 2009-2010.

Throughout his career Jan has made numerous significant contributions to scientific journals and he continues to serve on a number of international scientific committees and panels.

In May 2018, Jan was appointed as the Chief Forensic Scientist for Victoria Police.

Presentation 1: The case of Stacy and Nathalie – when DNA doesn’t work

In 2006, two girls aged seven and ten disappeared during a summer night in the city of Liege in Belgium.  The resulting police investigation highly relied on the forensic results obtained from an into depth analysis of microtraces which were collected on the girl’s clothes as well as on the clothes of the suspect. The results of the fibre, botanic residue and hair analysis were interpreted using evaluative reporting.  A population study of the jeans fabrics was performed to corroborate the results.

Presentation 2: The organisation of forensic science in Europe and the ENFSI

The organisation of forensic science in Europe and the operation of the European Network of Forensic Science Institutes (ENFSI) will be discussed.